Tag Archive | Carrot

Tasty Tuesdays – Rainbow Chili

With the temperatures starting to plummet, there is no better time to make a large pot of chili full of healthy and colourful vegetables!  This recipe is based on Jamie Oliver’s Chili Con Carne (Jamie’s Food Revolution), with a few modifications of my own.  It is super quick to prepare and makes for a hearty lunch for the rest of the week.

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ tbsp olive oil
  •  1 white onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 13 baby carrots
  • 2 celery  stalks
  • 1 red pepper
  • 1 yellow pepper
  • 1 large sweet potato
  • ½ tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp cayenne powder
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • Salt & pepper
  • 1 can chickpeas
  • 1 can white kidney beans
  • 1 can (28 fl oz) whole tomatoes (low sodium)
  • 2 cilantro stalks
  • 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • Garnishes: fresh guacamole, plain yogurt, cilantro and a wedge of lime

Directions

  • Heat the olive oil in a large pot.
  • Add to the pot all roughly chopped vegetables; onion, garlic, carrots, celery, red pepper, yellow pepper and sweet potato.
  • Add the paprika, cayenne powder, cumin, cinnamon, salt and pepper.  Stir so that all vegetables are evenly coated with the spices.
  • Cook on medium heat for approximately 10 minutes, stirring a few times.
  • Drain and wash the chickpeas and kidney beans.  Add to the pot.
  • Squash the tomatoes with a potato masher, or your clean hands and add entirety of the can to the pot.  As well, fill the can ¾ of the way with water and add to the pot.
  • Thoroughly clean the stalks of cilantro and chop into small pieces.  Add the stems to the pot and reserve the leaves for garnish.
  • Add the balsamic vinegar and stir thoroughly.
  • Bring to a boil and then simmer on low with the lid slightly askew for 1 hour.
  • Stir every so often.
  • Salt & pepper to taste and serve by itself or on a bed of your favourite rice.
  • Garnish with fresh guacamole, plain yogurt, cilantro leaves and a wedge of lime.

Interesting Facts

Chickpeas are referred to by many different names depending on where you reside; Garbanzo beans, Bengal grams and Egyptian peas to name a few.  This legume is one of the earliest cultivated foods, originally farmed in the Mediterranean Basin (Saxena, 1990).  Presently, it continues to be an important food in the Middle East and is favoured because of its buttery texture, nutty taste and year round availability.  Chickpeas are a great food for weight loss or management because of their high fiber and protein content paired with their low fat concentration.  This winning combination allows you to feel full longer while also aiding with blood sugar regulation (Balanza, et al., 2010).  Chickpeas contain no cholesterol and have actually been shown to improve cholesterol levels by decreasing LDL cholesterol (Bazzano, 2008).  A study by Pittaway et al., (2006) followed participants for five weeks who were randomized to either a fibrous diet supplemented with chickpeas or wheat.  Comparatively the group ingesting the chickpea supplemented diet had a significant reduction in both serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol.  Furthermore, the association between increased legumes, specifically chickpeas, in the diet and a reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease is very strong (Leterme, 2002) and warrants further research.  This vegetable’s amazing nutritional content includes important minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc.  As well, chickpeas are great sources of healthy fatty acids and vitamins A, B, C, E and K (USDA, 2012).   Best of all, it is easy to incorporate chickpeas into your diet since they can be found in a wide variety of recipes such as soups, salads and curries.  Additionally, if you have intolerance to gluten there is high protein chickpea flour, referred to as garam, which can be used as a wheat flour substitute in many recipes. So just remember that no matter what you call this universally tasty and versatile legume it comes packed with a multitude of health benefits.

Tasty Tuesdays – Ragu

Ragu is a delicious pasta sauce that complements nearly all noodle types.  This easy to prepare recipe amounted from many trials and is much healthier than the store-bought equivalent.  If you look at the ingredients list on store-bought pasta sauces you will see everything from sulphites to corn starch, to dehydrated vegetables and of course meat.  Who knows what grade of meat goes into these mass-produced jars, and who really wants to eat dehydrated vegetables?!  I encourage you to try this recipe, which is full of fresh vegetables and easily stores in the freezer.  It even tastes better the next day, once the flavours have a chance to marry.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 white onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 jalapeno pepper
  • 10 baby carrots
  • 8 brown mushrooms
  • 1/4 tsp fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dired basil
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 2 Bay leaves
  • 2 turkey sausages
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1/2 tsp brown sugar
  • 1 can of whole tomatoes
  • 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Directions

  • Heat olive oil in a large pot and sautee chopped onion, garlic, carrots and jalapeno for 5 minutes.
  • Add mushrooms and spices, continue to cook for 2 minutes.
  • Remove casings from turkey sausages and add to the sautee.  Break up the meat as it cooks for another 3-5 minutes.
  • Crush fennel seeds using a mortar and pestle, add to the pot and cook for 2 minutes.
  • Add tomatoe paste and brown sugar, mix thoroughly.
  • Crush the whole tomatoes and add the entire can to the pot. 
  • Bring to a boil, then lower temperature and simmer for 2-3 minutes.
  • Add balsamic vinegar and continue to simmer for 12-15 minutes.
  • Salt and pepper to taste. *Don’t forget to remove the Bay leaves.

Interesting Facts

Most people are aware that carrots are rich in beta-carotene which gives the typical orange carrot its colour (Martinez-Tomas et al., 2012).  However, most people probably didn’t know that the orange carrots only became popular in the 17th century because of their taste, adaptability and nutritional value.  Thousands of years earlier, the first wild carrots, which were purple and red, were domesticated in Afghanistan (Stolarczyk and Janick, 2011).  There have been many studies on vision health related to carrot consumption, although only a few have actually been conducted on humans.  One particular study by Coleman et al. (2008), observed that women who consumed more than 2 servings of carrots per week had a lower risk of developing glaucoma when compared to those who ate less than 1 serving of carrots per week.  Additionally, this root vegetable is an abundant source of beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is converted by the body into vitamin A which is well known for its role in maintaining healthy vision (Bobroff, 2011).  Another interesting longitudinal study completed in 2011 by Griep et al., found that higher intake of deep orange and yellow coloured fruits and vegetables may protect from coronary heart disease.  Thus to ensure a healthy diet it’s important to consume a variety of colourful fruits and vegetables, so enjoy your carrots since they come in a rainbow of colours.

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